Football, BBQ, and Moonshine: The Best of Southern Comics

by Tara Lawson-Harris

There’s a new trend in independent comic books—the Southern comic. And these books are delicious. Featuring Southern staples like down-home barbeque and moonshine, these stories highlight what the region is best known for. They also emphasize other great qualities of the South—strong family bonds, a desire to fight for what’s right, and an ability to overcome challenges like poverty. The issues these books tackle, such as racism, the opioid epidemic, and religion, are simultaneously distinctive to the region and relatable to the entire United States.

Unfortunately, this new genre is created almost exclusively by white men, which means you get a lot of the same tropes over and over. There’s a lot of room for growth. I mean, all you really need to do is create a story where the female character isn’t a waitress, stripper, or soldier and you’ve broken new ground. But while there’s a lack of diversity in terms of creators of the genre, the characters being written about are relatively diverse. At least two of the five feature women of color, and one has several people of color included in the story.

So without further ado, here are five great comic books about the South:


S

Southern Bastards by Jason Aaron and Jason Latour (2014, ongoing series)

By far my favorite comic on this list, Southern Bastards is about how the reverence of football leads to a culture of violence and corruption. When Earl Tubbs comes back to his Alabama hometown to settle his affairs, he immediately clashes with the football coach, who is known for having ties to crime in the area. This sets off a violent chain of events that leads to the introduction of the real protagonist: Roberta (Berta) Tubbs, a biracial woman and U. S. Marine who isn’t taking shit from anyone. The first 4 volumes are out now.

What makes it Southern: Football. It’s basically a religion in the book and in the South.

Loose Ends by Jason Latour, Chris Brunner, and Rico Renzi (2017, 4 issue mini-series)

Loose Ends is the only comic on this list that features characters of at least 3 different races. A self-proclaimed “southern crime romance,” the narrative centers on a biracial romance between an African American woman and a white man. While the main story takes place in the American South, there are flashbacks to some of the characters being at war in the Middle East. The characters avoid being stereotypes, and are relatively well developed. There are a lot of characters in the story, so the narrative can be confusing at points.

What really makes this story stand out is the coloring by Rico Renzi. He is best known for his use of bold, neon colors, but in Loose Ends he combines those neons with monochromatic spreads, creating a visual that you never get tired of.

What makes it Southern: Overcoming poverty.

Moonshine by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso (2017, ongoing series)

From the creative team of 100 Bullets, werewolves make moonshine and refuse to sell it to a New York gangster in 1929. Enough said.  

What makes it Southern: Bootlegging, which is foundational to the region’s history.  

Warlords of Appalachia by Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Jonas Scharf (2016, 4 issue mini-series)

This book is set in an alternate history where there was a second civil war, and Kentucky is the last state to hold out. I do want to emphasize that this is not a civil war based on slavery or racism, but instead on freedom of religion. The story focuses on Kade Mercer, a former Kentucky Guard who mostly keeps to himself, until his son is kidnapped by the United States government. Singled out by multiple groups for multiple reasons, Kade must navigate territories haunted by violent drug addicts, all while leading civilians to safety and avoiding being hunted himself.

What makes it Southern: The emphasis on drugs, religion, and family.

Cannibal by Brian Buccellato, Jennifer Young, and Matías Bergara (2016, ongoing series)

This series is about a society where the Yellow Fever returned, and in order to get rid of the plague, people infected were given medicine called a Y-PAK. What the CDC didn’t know when they issued the medicine was that a side-effect caused people to have to eat human flesh—otherwise they die of fever. What makes this story different from zombie stories is that these people are still fully functioning—they have jobs, families, and most importantly, remorse. Cannibal is set in set in Florida, where the outbreak is just now starting.

What makes it Southern: Florida swamps, and the mistrust of outsiders.

This list is not exhaustive of all the Southern books on the market, but it will give you a solid foundation of the genre. I fully expect that some of these books will end up being discussed on the podcast to see whether they belong in the canon.  The quality of these books are a bit of a mixed bag, but as more diverse voices and new stories get published, this will definitely be a genre to watch. I for one, can’t wait to read more of it.

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