Episode 1.05 – Secret Empire by Nick Spencer

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by Steven Harris & Tara Lawson-Harris

On the fifth episode of the Critically Comics podcast, Steven and Tara discuss the Marvel comics event Secret Empire by Nick Spencer! This episode covers the event series that focused on an evil Hydra controlled Steve Rogers taking over the Marvel Universe. Now that two years have passed since the series ended, did the event live up to hype? Is making Steve Rogers a nazi a step too far or is it an incident where life imitates art? Listen and let us know your thoughts on whether or not Secret Empire goes into the canon of all time greats!

Football, BBQ, and Moonshine: The Best of Southern Comics

by Tara Lawson-Harris

There’s a new trend in independent comic books—the Southern comic. And these books are delicious. Featuring Southern staples like down-home barbeque and moonshine, these stories highlight what the region is best known for. They also emphasize other great qualities of the South—strong family bonds, a desire to fight for what’s right, and an ability to overcome challenges like poverty. The issues these books tackle, such as racism, the opioid epidemic, and religion, are simultaneously distinctive to the region and relatable to the entire United States.

Unfortunately, this new genre is created almost exclusively by white men, which means you get a lot of the same tropes over and over. There’s a lot of room for growth. I mean, all you really need to do is create a story where the female character isn’t a waitress, stripper, or soldier and you’ve broken new ground. But while there’s a lack of diversity in terms of creators of the genre, the characters being written about are relatively diverse. At least two of the five feature women of color, and one has several people of color included in the story.

So without further ado, here are five great comic books about the South:


S

Southern Bastards by Jason Aaron and Jason Latour (2014, ongoing series)

By far my favorite comic on this list, Southern Bastards is about how the reverence of football leads to a culture of violence and corruption. When Earl Tubbs comes back to his Alabama hometown to settle his affairs, he immediately clashes with the football coach, who is known for having ties to crime in the area. This sets off a violent chain of events that leads to the introduction of the real protagonist: Roberta (Berta) Tubbs, a biracial woman and U. S. Marine who isn’t taking shit from anyone. The first 4 volumes are out now.

What makes it Southern: Football. It’s basically a religion in the book and in the South.

Loose Ends by Jason Latour, Chris Brunner, and Rico Renzi (2017, 4 issue mini-series)

Loose Ends is the only comic on this list that features characters of at least 3 different races. A self-proclaimed “southern crime romance,” the narrative centers on a biracial romance between an African American woman and a white man. While the main story takes place in the American South, there are flashbacks to some of the characters being at war in the Middle East. The characters avoid being stereotypes, and are relatively well developed. There are a lot of characters in the story, so the narrative can be confusing at points.

What really makes this story stand out is the coloring by Rico Renzi. He is best known for his use of bold, neon colors, but in Loose Ends he combines those neons with monochromatic spreads, creating a visual that you never get tired of.

What makes it Southern: Overcoming poverty.

Moonshine by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso (2017, ongoing series)

From the creative team of 100 Bullets, werewolves make moonshine and refuse to sell it to a New York gangster in 1929. Enough said.  

What makes it Southern: Bootlegging, which is foundational to the region’s history.  

Warlords of Appalachia by Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Jonas Scharf (2016, 4 issue mini-series)

This book is set in an alternate history where there was a second civil war, and Kentucky is the last state to hold out. I do want to emphasize that this is not a civil war based on slavery or racism, but instead on freedom of religion. The story focuses on Kade Mercer, a former Kentucky Guard who mostly keeps to himself, until his son is kidnapped by the United States government. Singled out by multiple groups for multiple reasons, Kade must navigate territories haunted by violent drug addicts, all while leading civilians to safety and avoiding being hunted himself.

What makes it Southern: The emphasis on drugs, religion, and family.

Cannibal by Brian Buccellato, Jennifer Young, and Matías Bergara (2016, ongoing series)

This series is about a society where the Yellow Fever returned, and in order to get rid of the plague, people infected were given medicine called a Y-PAK. What the CDC didn’t know when they issued the medicine was that a side-effect caused people to have to eat human flesh—otherwise they die of fever. What makes this story different from zombie stories is that these people are still fully functioning—they have jobs, families, and most importantly, remorse. Cannibal is set in set in Florida, where the outbreak is just now starting.

What makes it Southern: Florida swamps, and the mistrust of outsiders.

This list is not exhaustive of all the Southern books on the market, but it will give you a solid foundation of the genre. I fully expect that some of these books will end up being discussed on the podcast to see whether they belong in the canon.  The quality of these books are a bit of a mixed bag, but as more diverse voices and new stories get published, this will definitely be a genre to watch. I for one, can’t wait to read more of it.

Building Multi-Medial Comic Book Canons

by Steven Harris

After Tara’s explanation of what “canon” means in regards to both literature and this podcast, let’s expand upon what can be considered canon.

While a canon is typically limited to only one medium (i.e. novels or films), with fandoms demanding more content for their favorite franchises, creators are more willing to expand their canon to multi-media platforms. Multi-media adaptions of comic book based intellectual property can never share the same linear canon as their source material due to the never ending nature of comic books. However, due to the strength in the writing of certain adaptions and how widely they’ve been embraced by both the comic community and mainstream audiences, select few multi-media adaptions of comic inspired works can be folded into a particular character’s canon. 

Multi-media canons are not a new phenomena. For example, Star Trek originated as a television show in 1966 and has since become a multi-media franchise that has grown to include five additional television series, thirteen full length feature films, and countless novels and graphic novels. Previously, for a fan to consume everything that existed in the canon of the  Star Trek Universe they would have to consume no less than four different types of media. For a new fan, that much content can be intimidating and lead to struggles in determining what is canon — a debate that is only exacerbated with the inclusion of the dreaded “reboot” phenomena. Reboots often leave fans scratching their heads over what is still in canon  and what is being quietly swept under the rug.

Occasionally, the owners of the intellectual property will descend from their high perch and plainly state for fans what is and isn’t canon. Perhaps the most controversial example of this is when Disney acquired the Star Wars franchise in 2012; after picking up the franchise, Disney firmly stated that from 2012 on only the Star Wars films and Clone Wars animated series would be considered in continuity and that all other stories (video games, comics, novels, etc.) would be considered non-canonical and be retired/rebranded as in-universe “legends”. To further drive home their point, Disney stated they would be creating an entirely new canon that would be established solely by material that they would exclusively oversee. This declaration alienated fans who spent decades enjoying these previously published works because they were being told that the stories they revered were no longer important to the other franchise. This frustration that was all too similar and all too familiar with DC Comics fans who struggled to determine what was in still in continuity after the company wide “New 52” relaunch of 2012.

Sometimes fans themselves are divided about a canon being divided between different mediums. A more recent example of a multi-medial canon is the creation of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter.  If a fan wishes to complete the full Harry Potter canon that was established with the original novels, they must switch mediums at least three times. J.K. Rowling launched Pottermore, an exclusively online library of short stories and various writings that Rowling has stated are all canonical. In 2016 J.K. Rowling co-wrote Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, a stage play that acts as an epilogue to the Harry Potter sage. Furthermore, 2016 saw the launch of the Fantastic Beast series — a five part film saga that canonically takes place sixty years before the first Harry Potter novel and features several characters referenced in the original book series.  The Fantastic Beasts series has been met with a mixed reception with some voicing frustration with J.K. Rowling by comparing her to George Lucas due to her inability to stop tinkering with her previous stories. 

While the previously examples of Star Trek, Star Wars and The Wizarding World of Harry Potter are multimedia canons, they are still linear progressions of the same story.  If a timeline were to be created for any of those franchises, each entry (regardless of medium) could be plotted in a mostly linear path. Comic books and comic books films cannot share the same linear canonical timeline due to the ongoing nature of comic books. At best comic books films can be adaptations of poplar comic book storylines. It would be impossible for comic books films to be anything other than loose adaptations of already pre- existing comic books storylines — film studios would not expect film goers to read the complete 70+ years of superhero comic books before watching a single two hour film. Conversely, it would be just as alienating for a comic book reader to be forced to into a cinema to see how a particular storyline would be resolved.  However, an argument can be be that select pieces of media should have a place in certain character’s individual canon. 

Due to the mass popularity of superhero media, a cross pollination effect has occurred where media outside of comics has started to effect comic books own continuity.  The best example of this is with Batman and how the various forms of multi-medal Batmen have affected the character’s in universe continuity. Without the creative output of Bruce Timm & Paul Dini on B:TAS, there would be no definitive takes on characters such as Ra’s Al Ghul, Mr. Freeze, or the Joker

Unquestionably, the legacy of B:TAS is the creation of Harely Quinn. Harley Quinn first appeared in “Joker’s Favor”, the twenty-second episode of B:TAS’s inaugural season. What could have been an inconsequential throw away character was welcomed by fans with open arms. Quinn made her first published appearance in 1993 in a printed spinoff of B:TAS. Five years after that, Harley officially entered the Batman canon when she was introduced during the No Man’s Land crossover. Within a decade of her appearance on the B:TAS she was given her own solo series in 2001. Since being introduced into the DC Universe, Harely has become a staple in Batman’s canon but has become popular anti-hero and well celebrated LGTBQ icon. Due to fans connecting with the character, she ended up being a lead in 2016’s Suicide Squad feature film where she was portrayed by Margot Robbie.

Another example of outside media having seismic ramifications on the comic book industry is the rise of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. In attempts to capitalize on the success of their films, Marvel has made several attempts to streamline the comic book versions of their characters to match what is seen on screen. The biggest example the MCU has had on Marvel Comics is the way that Iron Man/ Tony Stark has been written for the past decade — what is seen on the page is a complete distillation of Robert Downey Jr.’s personality. (We will dive more into the MCU’s effect on Marvel comic books in an ongoing blog series after Avengers: Endgame is released.)

While our podcast will continue to focus on what published comic books can be considered canon worthy, we will be launching a regular blog post series to determine what pieces of comic book inspired media can included in individual characters’ own personal canon. These characters have transcended off the page and established their own non-linear multimedia canons – canons that are not defined by events that add to their overarching story but instead a canon made up of pieces of work that cut to the core aspects of the character.

Episode 1.03 – Squirrel Girl by Ryan North & Erica Henderson

by Steven Harris & Tara Lawson-Harris

Download and listen through iTunes!

On the third episode of the Critically Comics podcast, Steven and Tara discuss Marvel’s Squirrel Girl by Ryan North and Erica Henderson! This episode covers the first three volumes of the series and the representation of the character in outside media. Will Squirrel Girl be the best comedy series to be introduced into the canon or will it divide the hosts? Join the debate and let us know what you think of the series!

Episode 1.02 – Maus by Art Spiegelman

by Steven Harris & Tara Lawson-Harris

Welcome back to the second episode of Critically Comics! This month Tara & Steve discuss the 1992 Pulitzer Prize wining graphic novel, Maus by Art Spiegelman. We discuss the legacy of Maus and how it manages to be more than just a depiction of the Holocaust with cats and mice. Download and listen now! Let us know your thoughts as to whether or not Maus goes into the comics canon!

Listen here or through the Apple iTunes store!